The Nature of Us
is the debut album from Joel Ansett, an artist who strives to go beyond genres. By combining folk music with pop and rock and Rhythm and Blues, Ansett manages to create a vibrant sound that’s all his own.

The album starts out with “Kingdom Come,” a nice flowing RnB song that catches your attention right off the bat. The Nature of Us has a wonderful flow from one song to the next, with an overall theme of love to wrap it all up together nice and tidy. As the album progresses, the songs occasionally slow down and become a little bit more intimate. It sounds like Ansett made the The Nature of Us as a gift for someone he loved, and the songs become more intimate as the relationship between them grows more intimate. There’s also an underlying message of faith, which expands upon the meaning the listeners can draw from the songs as well.

The melodies are catchy and soothing all at the same time. You melt right into the different instruments and grooves, and sometimes you even groove along with them. There’s a variety of instruments that create these exceptionally vibrant melodies, but the most noticeable one is Ansett’s voice. It’s far from perfect, though it’s just skilled enough to catch you by surprise. He’s got a delightful control over it, never letting it choke out on him or get away from him too much. It’s very reminiscent of Andy Grammer or Oli Murs.

Sure you have all of the usual instruments that string together notes to make a song; guitar, percussions, etc. But occasionally, you’ll be swept off your feet by a gorgeous string section – like in “Tragedy Is Not the End.” The songs that stood out the most were the songs that combined these unexpected instrumentals with a unique melody; “Covered Up” being another one. In the end, no song sound alike on this album.

Joel Ansett makes his talent very apparent on The Nature of Us. He makes his debut with a bang. However, there is a tiny little flaw. On the softer, more acoustic sounding songs, you almost lose your attention on it. You don’t do it on purpose, and they don’t sound exactly the same, it’s just they start to run together because the songs themselves are about so much similar things. Instead of picking up where one song ends and the other begins, you lose track.

That shouldn’t distract from the beauty of this album. Ansett obviously has a talent, and he’s determined to make his musical dreams come true. He draws from other artists in his unique niche, like Allen Stone and Andy Grammer, and he’s at least trying to make his music all his own. The Nature of Us is the perfect start to what hopes to be a unique and long career.

Want to listen to The Nature of Us for yourself? You can get it on iTunes.